John Joseph Mastandrea speaks on Gulen Movement (Hizmet) – Fethullah Gulen

John Joseph Mastandrea

John Joseph Mastandrea says: “When I hear, “let your love be as wide as the ocean,” how can one disagree with words like that? When I’ve read his books and listen to some of the talks, I find he’s a, how would you put it? A combination of perhaps a Gandhi and a Dalai Lama, so to speak. Maybe even Mother Theresa. And he’s not just speaking. He’s living the ideas that he is conveying to many people.

” When I hear, “let your love be as wide as the ocean,” how can one disagree with words like that? When I’ve read his books and listen to some of the talks, I find he’s a, how would you put it? A combination of perhaps a Gandhi and a Dalai Lama, so to speak. Maybe even Mother Theresa. And he’s not just speaking. He’s living the ideas that he is conveying to many people.”

“Unfortunately, there’s other areas in the Muslim world, as we see what’s happening right now in Iraq, that represents a fundamentalism that is not unique to Islam. I mean, every culture, Christians have fundamentalists, Hindus have fundamentalists, Buddhists, but the danger is that that is perceived as the only pathway in Islam. And that unfortunately, especially after, when we think of 9/11, overcoming, the Hizmet Movement is a great way to overcome the preconceived misconceptions that lead to Islamophobia..” 

” Muslims speaking to non-Muslims is speaking to the issue of disarming fear and inviting compassion. Inviting that listening moment, but realizing that as we build homes beside each other, as we live in apartments or condominiums, as we sit on boards and committees, we’re making decisions that affect everyone, and not just ourselves.”

“.. I believe the Hizmet Movement isn’t worrying about taking the blame, but overcoming that barrier, and being the instruments of change, of healing, of transformation.”

John Joseph Mastandrea – Bio

John Joseph Mastandrea
John Joseph Mastandrea

John Joseph Mastandrea – The Rev. Dr. John Joseph Mastandrea became minister of spiritual growth and pastoral care development at Metropolitan United in 2000. John Joseph Mastandrea cut his teeth in the Etobicoke area of Toronto and now resides in Cabbagetown, he is “connected with the urban landscape, with the internal and eternal song.”

John Joseph Mastandrea has Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, Master of Divinity, Master of Religious Education, Master of Arts and Ministry  of Spirituality degrees , all from the University of Toronto. John Joseph Mastandrea completed his Doctorate from Chicago Theological Seminary, May 2009. Ordained in 1989, he is a certified Labyrinth Facilitator, Stephen Leader, and Spiritual Director following in the footsteps of Ignatius Loyola and Teresa of Avila. John Joseph believes in nurturing body, mind and spirit. Monday to Friday at the local gymn, reading and meditating daily  weaves three key components of life. Nurture for self to nurture for others. This is the credo he lives by.John Joseph Mastandrea is a Christian Mystic who lives by these words.

“The friend who can be silent with us in a moment of despair or confusion, who can stay with us in an hour of grief and bereavement, who can tolerate not knowing… not healing, not curing… that is a friend who cares.” Henri Nouwen

John Joseph Mastandrea has served congregations from the Maritimes, Saskatchewan, northern Ontario and rural Quebec to urban and suburban parts of the Greater Toronto Area.

John Joseph Mastandrea has volunteer work for the church and community includes: Chairperson of the Toronto South East Presbytery Pastoral Relations Commission,  membership in the Toronto Area Interfaith Council, Police Chaplin to 51 Division, Membership in the Toronto Rotary, Chair Person the Toronto Rotary Community Services Committee and Chair of the World Aids Concert Committee a benefit for Casey House. Volunteer ministry has included positions as chairperson of the Worship and Liturgy Committee of Toronto Conference for four years, chairperson of the Mission Committee of Toronto South Presbytery, chairperson of the Planning and Development Committee and co-chairperson of the Christian Development Committee in York Presbytery north of Toronto, chairperson of the AIDS Committee of York Region since 1998, and member of the Pastoral Care Committee of York Central Hospital in Richmond Hill. John Joseph Mastandrea represented Canada as a delegate to the World Council of Churches in Geneva, Switzerland, in February 1990.

Recently, John Joseph Mastandrea was awareded the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Award in 2012 to celebrate the ongoing spirit of his community work in the surrounding neighbourhood.

Today John Joseph Mastandrea seeks to meet people where they are and  build the capacity for relations between people in a diverse spectrum of society.

Intercultural Dialogue Institute

Intercultural Dialogue Institute is a non-profit organization whose purpose is to advance social cohesion via(through) personal interaction by promoting respect and mutual understanding among people of all cultures and faiths through dialogue and partnership. Intercultural Dialogue Institute aims to promote enduring interfaith and intercultural cooperation, tolerance and dialogue by sharing our differences and similarities in an effort to enhance civil society, to promote the development of human values, and to advance diversity and multiculturalism in the society. The Institute aims to eliminate or reduce false stereotypes, prejudices and unjustified fears through direct human communication. By this mission IDI aims to contribute to improvement of diversity, pluralism and multiculturalism throughout Canada. In this regard, IDI organizes social, educational and cultural activities such as lectures, seminars, conferences, discussion forums, luncheons, informative dinners, programs for students and youth, intercultural exchange trips, courses, outreach programs.

It was founded by Turkish Canadians inspired by the teachings and example of Fethullah Gulen. The Institute is not a religious or ethnic organization. It aims to facilitate dialogue on a whole range of social issues, regardless of any particular faith or religion. It stands for democracy, human rights, the non-instrumentalisation of religion in politics, equality and freedom of speech.

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